Owners Manual

True bicycle owners manual

 

GENERAL RULES AND GUIDELINES

Riding Safety Tips

  1. Always wear a CPSC approved helmet and some form of eye protection
  2. Always ride with a rear view mirror attached to your helmet or mounted on the tricycle.
  3. Obey all traffic rules and regulations, signs and signals.
  4. Ride on the side of the road, going in the same direction as the traffic and in single file.
  5. Use proper hand signals when turning or stopping.
  6. Be alert at all times, especially watch for cars pulling out into traffic or for opening doors.
  7. Stop at stop signs and traffic lights.  Observe and yield the right of way.
  8. Inspect your True Bicycle before every ride.  Make sure all nuts and bolts are securely tightened.  Check your brakes by applying them and rock your True Bicycle forward and back to make sure they are engaging properly.  Check your tires for proper air pressure as indicated on the sidewall of the tires.  Make sure the quick release on the handlebar stem, seat post and front wheel are secure.  Also check for any other possible mechanical problems.
  9. Do not “stunt ride” or hitch a ride on other vehicles.
  10. Do not ride carelessly.
  11. Do not ride with headphones.  They mask traffic sounds and can distract you from concentrating on what’s going on around you.
  12. Never carry passengers unless it is a child wearing an approved helmet in a correctly-mounted child carrier or child carrying trailer.
  13. Do not carry objects which obstruct your vision or your control of the bicycle or which could become caught in the moving bicycle parts.
  14. Use extreme caution when riding in wet, icy or otherwise hazardous conditions.

WARNING: True Bicycles, is not responsible for accidents resulting from failure to comply with all bicycling safety laws.  Contact your local authorities for more specific information about such laws.

Night Riding Tips

  1. Your True Bicycle is equipped with front, rear, wheel and pedal reflectors.  They should be kept clean at all times, and never be removed from your bicycle.
  2. Always use an appropriate lighting system when riding at night.
  3. Ride with extreme caution.  Be alert for cars, pedestrians, runners, and other bicyclists.  Ride defensively and watch for road hazards.
  4. Wear light colored clothing and use reflective tape on clothing or helmet to help make you more visible at night.

WARNING: Reflectors alone are not adequate for night visibility.  Use a high quality front and rear lighting system for greater visibility.

Wet Weather Caution

When rims and brakes are wet due to muddy, wet or icy road conditions the distance needed to stop safely increases.  You must, therefore, anticipate the additional distance needed to stop in such circumstances.  Reduce your speed and take corners slowly and carefully.  Hard application of the brakes on wet or icy pavement (or on loose gravel or debris) can cause the wheel(s) to lock up and skid, resulting in possible loss of control.  Slowly apply brakes in a gradual, controlled manner to avoid skidding or loss of control.

 

CHANGING COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES

            Many components and accessories are available to enhance your True Bicycle.  Remember, if you change components or add accessories you do so at your own risk.  Before installing any component or accessory, including a different size tire, ensure that it is compatible with your True Bicycle by checking with your dealer or a bicycle repair technician.  Be sure to read the instructions that come with the products you purchase for your True Bicycle.

WARNING:  Changing the components may void the warranty on your True Bicycle.  Check with your dealer before changing components on your True Bicycle.      

 

TECH

Handlebars

            The handlebar stem of your True Bicycle will have an etched or stamped mark on the shaft which marks the “minimum insertion” or “maximum extension” of the stem.  This mark MUST NOT be visible above the headset.  If this mark is visible the stem may break or damage the steerer tube which could cause a loss of control.

            On some bicycles, changing the stem or stem height can affect the tension of the front brake cable.  If the front brake pads move in toward the rim or out away from the rim when the stem is changed, correctly adjust the brakes before you ride.

If the stem binder bolt, the handlebar binder bolt or the bar end extension clamping bolt is not tightened properly, steering action may be compromised which could result in a loss of control.

- Place the front wheel of your True Bicycle between your legs.

- Attempt to twist handlebar/stem assembly.

- If you can twist the stem in relation to the front wheel, the handlebars in relation

to the stem, or the bar end extensions in relation to the handlebar, the bolts are not tightened properly.

- The position of the controls on the handlebars can be changed.  Ask a bicycle    repair technician to make the adjustments for you.

Brakes

         Your True Bicycle is equipped with either coaster brakes or hand brakes.  Be sure you know how your brakes work before taking your first ride. 

-   Do not ride with worn brake pads or improperly adjusted brakes as this can result in serious injury or death.

-   Application of the brakes that is too hard or sudden can lock up the wheel which may lead to loss of control.  Sudden or excessive application of the front brake may propel the rider over the handlebars, resulting in serious injury or death.

-   Certain kind of brakes such as disc brakes and linear-pull brakes are very powerful.  Extra care must be taken when using these brake types.

-   Disc brakes can become hot with extended use.  Do not touch a disc until it has had plenty of time to cool.

 

Coaster Brakes

- A coaster brake is activated by reversing the rotation of the pedal cranks.

      - With the pedal cranks in a nearly horizontal position, apply downward foot pressure on the rear pedal.  Braking will be activated by approximately 1/8 turn of the pedal.

      - The more downward pressure that is applied to the pedal, the more braking force until the rear wheel stops rotating and skids.

WARNING:  Before riding make sure your brakes are working properly.  If they are not working properly, have them serviced by a bicycle repair technician.

               - Do not attempt to disassemble, repair or adjust your coaster brake yourself.  Have your coaster brake serviced by a bicycle repair technician.

         Hand Brakes

               - A three-wheeled bicycle may have a hand brake that is a lever which controls a brake located on the front wheel.

               - Sudden or excessive application of the front brake may propel the rider over the handlebars, resulting in serious injury or death.

               - Hand brakes control your speed by creating friction between the brake shoe and the wheel rim or brake disc.  To ensure maximum friction is available, keep wheel rims, brake shoes and brake discs clean and free of lubricants, waxes and polishes.

               - Make sure you can reach and squeeze the brake levers comfortably.  If your brake lever needs adjusting, consult a bicycle repair technician.

         Braking Technique

                     Brakes do not only stop your bicycle but they control your speed.  Maximum braking will occur just before the wheel locks up and starts to skid.  Once skidding occurs, you lose most of your stopping force and all directional control.  Practice slowing and stopping without locking up a wheel.  This technique is called progressive brake modulation.  Do not slam on the coaster brake or jerk the brake lever into position.  Instead, apply progressive force on the pedal or gently squeeze the brake lever to increase the braking force little by little.  Allow the wheel to keep rotating just short of lockup.  It is crucial to develop a feel for braking on different surfaces.  Please practice braking in an unrestricted area to get a feel for braking on different surfaces.

                     Although your bike begins to slow when you brake, your body wants to continue at the speed at which it was going.  This causes transfer of weight to the front wheel or front wheel hub.  As you apply the brakes and your weight shifts forward, you need to shift your body toward the rear of the bike in order to transfer weight to the rear wheel.  Shifting your weight to the rear is even more important on steep descents, because descents shift weight forward.

                     Effective speed control is achieved by controlling wheel lockup and weight transfer.  Practice these techniques away from traffic and other hazards.

                     Take extra care when riding on loose surfaces or in wet conditions.  Wheels will have less cornering and braking traction, and can lock up will less brake force.  Moisture or dirt on the brake shoes of hand brakes reduces their gripping ability.  Go more slowly to begin with on wet surfaces.

 

Wheels

         Removing a bolt-on front wheel

            1.   On your brake mechanism, pull the black rubber boot away from the end of the metal noodle that covers the brake cable.  Squeeze the brake arms together with one hand and simultaneously unhook the lower end of the noodle from the keyhole-type slot in the brake arm link.

            2.   With an appropriately-sized wrench, loosen the two axle nuts enough to allow removal of the wheel. 

            3.   Raise the front of the bicycle a few inches off the ground.  Tap the top of the wheel with your palm to knock the wheel from the fork ends.

         Installing a bolt-on front wheel

1.      Make sure the steering fork is facing forward.  Insert the wheel between the fork blades so the axle seats firmly at the top of the slots at the tips of the fork blades.  The axle nut washers should be on the outside between the fork blade and axle nut. 

2.      Push the wheel firmly to the top of the slots in the fork dropouts and simultaneously center the wheel rim in the fork.  Use an appropriately-sized wrench to tighten the axle nuts as tight as you can.

            3.   Hook the brakes back up by holding the brake arms together as you insert the lower end of the noodle into the keyhole-type slot in the brake arm link.  Replace the rubber boot over the end of the noodle.  Give the brake lever a few test pulls to ensure proper function of the brakes.

         Removing a bolt-on rear wheel with hand brake

            1.   On your brake mechanism, pull the black rubber boot away from the end of the metal noodle that covers the brake cable.  Squeeze the brake arms together with one hand and simultaneously unhook the lower end of the noodle from the keyhole-type slot in the brake arm link.

2.   If the rear wheel or wheels are equipped with chain tension adjusters, loosen the nuts on the adjusters by turning both counterclockwise with an appropriately-sized wrench an equal number of turns.

3.      With an appropriately-sized wrench, loosen the two axle nuts.

4.      Push the wheel forward to allow some slack in the chain.  Remove the chain from the chainring and wheel sprocket. 

5.      Remove the wheel from the frame.

         Installing a bolt-on rear wheel with hand brake

1.      Put the chain on the wheel sprocket.  Insert the wheel into the frame dropouts and push it all the way into the dropouts.  The axle nut washers should be on the outside between the frame and the axle nut.

2.      Put the chain onto the chainring.

3.      If your wheel has chain tension adjusters, position the chain tension adjusters in the dropouts and, using a wrench to turn the adjusters clockwise, pull the wheel back in the dropouts so that it is straight in the frame and has about ¼ inch of up-and-down play.  Replace chain adjuster endcaps if provided.

4.      Tighten the axle nuts as much as possible using an appropriately-sized wrench. 

 

            5.   Hook the brakes back up by holding the brake arms together as you insert the lower end of the noodle into the keyhole-type slot in the brake arm link.  Replace the rubber boot over the end of the noodle.  Give the brake lever a few test pulls to ensure proper function of the brakes.

         Removing a bolt-on rear wheel with coaster brake

1.      Disengage the coaster brake arm from its frame bracket.

2.      With an appropriately-sized wrench, loosen the two axle nuts.

3.      Push the wheel forward to allow some slack in the chain.  Remove the chain from the chainring and wheel sprocket.

4.      Remove the wheel from the frame.

         Installing a bolt-on rear wheel with coaster brake

            1.   Put the chain on the wheel sprocket.  Insert the wheel into the frame dropouts and push it all the way into the dropouts.  The axle nut washers should be on the outside between the frame and the axle nut.

            2.   Put the chain onto the chainring.

            3.   Pull the wheel back in the dropouts so that it is straight in the frame and has about ¼ inch of up-and-down play.

            4.   Return the coaster brake arm to its frame bracket.  Do not fully tighten the securing nut and bolt at this time.

            5.   Tighten the axle nuts as much as possible, using an appropriately-sized wrench.  Spin the wheel to ensure it is straight in the frame.

            6.   Fully tighten the coaster brake arm securing nut and bolt and check that the brake is functioning correctly.

Cautionary Note Regarding Toe Overlap

         Toe overlap is when your toe comes in contact with the front wheel when you turn the handlebars to steer while one of the pedals is in the forwardmost position.  This can be avoided by keeping the inside pedal up and the outside pedal down then turning.  Toe overlap could result in a loss of control.  Take extra care while turning if you have toe overlap.

Tires and Tubes

         Tires

               - Once you have spent a while riding your True Bicycle, you may decide to buy different tires.  Either your True Bicycles dealer or a bicycle repair technician can assist you in the tire selection process.

               - The size and pressure rating are marked on the sidewall of tires. 

               - Never inflate a tire beyond the maximum pressure marked on the sidewall.  Exceeding the maximum pressure could blow the tire off of the rim, causing damage to the bicycle, rider and other bystanders.

               - It is recommended to use a bicycle pump with a gauge to ensure proper inflation of your tire.

               - It is NOT recommended to use a gas station air hose to inflate your bicycle tire, as the rapidly moving air increases the risk of a tube blowout.

               - Tire pressure is given as a maximum pressure or a pressure range.  Tire pressure will affect how a tire performs under varying terrain and weather conditions.  The lowest rolling resistance will be achieved when the tires are inflated to near the maximum pressure, but this also gives the harshest ride.  High pressures are best for smooth, dry pavement.

               - Pressures at the bottom of the pressure range perform best on slick terrain like hard-packed clay and on loose surfaces such as deep, dry sand.

               - DO NOT ride with tire pressure that is too low for your weight and riding conditions.  This could result in a tube puncture and may damage the wheel rim.

               - Familiarize yourself with how correctly inflated tires should look and feel.

               - Use a high quality dial gauge to check the pressure of your tires.

         Tire Valves

               Your True Bicycle will be equipped with inner tubes that have a Schrader valve.  You must use a bicycle pump with a fitting that will accommodate a Schrader valve.  The Schrader valve is like the valve on a car tire.  To inflate a Schrader valve tube, remove the valve cap and clamp the pump head onto the valve stem.  To let air out of a Schrader Valve, press down the pin in the end of the valve stem with a key or other object.

         Tubes

               If you must patch a tube, bear in mind that it is an emergency repair.  If the patch is applied incorrectly, or if several patches are applied, the patch may fail.  This may result in tube failure and a loss of control.  Replace a patched tube as soon as possible.

 

SERVICE

         It is not possible for this manual to provide all of the information required to properly maintain your True Bicycle.  To minimize the risk of accident or injury, it is important to have any maintenance or repairs performed by a bicycle repair technician.  It is also important to understand that your individual maintenance requirements will be determined by factors from your riding style to your geographic location.  Consult your dealer or a bicycle repair technician to help determine your maintenance requirements.

         Many bicycle service and repair tasks require special knowledge and tools.  Do not attempt any adjustments or repairs on your True Bicycle until you have learned from your dealer or a bicycle repair technician how to perform the tasks properly.   Improper adjustment or service may result in damage to your True Bicycle which could result in an accident and cause injury or death.

         Your True Bicycle and its components are subject to wear and stress.  Different bicycle components and mechanisms will experience wear at different rates.  Do not exceed a component’s life cycle; a worn component can fail suddenly and catastrophically, resulting in serious injury or death.  Be aware of scratches, cracks, fraying and discoloration, as these can be signs of the end of a part’s useful life.  Replace a part that shows any of these signs.  While the materials and workmanship of your True Bicycle or its components may be covered by a warranty, there is no guarantee that the product will last the term of the warranty.  Product life is determined by the kind of riding that you do and the manner in which you treat your bicycle.  The warranty is not to suggest that the bicycle or its components are unbreakable or will last forever.  It means that the bicycle is covered subject to the terms of the warranty.

         Check your True Bicycle thoroughly if a crash or other impact occurs.  Incidents of this type can put extraordinary stress on bicycle components, causing premature fatigue.  Components suffering from stress fatigue can fail suddenly, causing a loss of control, injury or death.  

 

 

True Bicycles Limited Warranty

 

LIMITED ONE-YEAR WARRANTY OF COMPLETE BICYCLE

         Subject to the following limitations, terms and conditions, True Bicycles warrants to the original owner of each new True Bicycle that this bicycle is free of defective materials and workmanship for a period of one year from the date of the original purchase from an authorized True Bicycles dealer.

 

LIMITED FIVE-YEAR WARRANTY ON STEEL AND ALUMINUM BICYCLE FRAMES

         For steel and aluminum frames this warranty shall continue in full force and effect for the duration of the original ownership following the date of purchase.  This warranty does not apply to paint, finish, or any parts attached to the bicycle including but not limited to forks, drive train components, brakes, seats, seat posts handlebars, stems or wheels and their components.  Paint and finish and the other parts attached to your True Bicycle are covered under a limited one-year warranty.

         The original owner shall pay all labor and shipping charges associated with the repair or replacement of all parts under this warranty.

         All of the above limited warranties are conditional upon the bicycle being properly maintained and operated under normal conditions and use.  This warranty is void if the bicycle or frameset was not purchased and assembled by an authorized True Bicycles dealer. 

 

All True Bicycle parts should be inspected periodically by an authorized True Bicycles dealer.

 

WHAT IS NOT COVERED

         Failure due to accident, abuse, neglect, normal wear and tear, improper assembly, improper fit, maintenance by anyone other than an authorized True Bicycles dealer or use of parts inconsistent with the use originally intended for the bicycle as sold are not covered by this warranty.  True Bicycles defines the intended use of its bicycles as riding in a controlled manner in a location approved for a two- or three-wheeled bicycle with all wheels on the ground.  Riding in a manner other than that voids the warranty.

 

WHY IT’S NOT COVERED

         If you drive any vehicle and crash it, the manufacturer will not replace or repair it for free unless the crash was caused by a defective product.  Rider errors, carelessness and hazards you may encounter while riding that damage your bike are not covered by this warranty.  

 

WHAT TRUE BICYCLES WILL DO IF YOU HAVE A WARRANTY CLAIM

         True Bicycles will replace or repair any part that is determined to be covered by this warranty.  This limited warranty is only made to the original owner and is not transferrable.  An original bill of sale or proof of purchase that identifies the bicycle or frame by the serial number must accompany all claims.  Claims must be made through an authorized True Bicycles dealer.  The original owner shall pay all labor and shipping charges associated with the repair or replacement of all parts under this warranty.

         If the warranty claim on your True Bicycles frame or parts is determined to be invalid, True Bicycles will offer a replacement frame or part of at least equal value at a reduced price.  This transaction will be offered only through an authorized True Bicycles dealer.  The replacement frame/parts must be assembled/installed by an authorized True Bicycles dealer to maintain the warranty.

 

LEGAL STUFF

         There are no warranties of guarantees expressed or implied made by True Bicycles on this bicycle.  The sole and exclusive liability of True Bicycles and/or any of its authorized dealers, affiliates of agents pursuant to this warranty shall be for the repair and replacement of the defective part; incidental or consequential damages are expressly excluded hereunder.  This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which may vary depending state, province or country where you purchased this True Bicycle. 

         Bicycling is a potentially hazardous activity.  The user assumes the risk of any personal injury, damage to or failure of the bicycle and any other losses if True Bicycles are used in any competitive event or used for stunt riding.

         This True Bicycle is not manufactured, marketed, designed or intended to be altered for use at any time in stunt riding or similar activity.  True Bicycles, its dealers, affiliates or agents shall not be liable under this warranty nor under any state or federal law or the common law or otherwise for any damage, failure, including personal injury, resulting from such use or alteration.